You are currently viewing abstracts filed in the session "Open"

Jag undervisar nybörjare i svenska på gymnasienivå på Lyceum 1553 im. V.I.Vernadskogo, Moskva. Som fördjupning av språkkursen forskar mina studenter om Sveriges kultur och historia, bland annat om runinskrifter samt runstenarnas ornament. Skolan har vetenskaplig profil. Under läsåret arbetar varje student med något forskningsprojekt inom naturvetenskap eller humaniora och berättar sedan om projektet på skolans […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

When dealing with documenting runic inscriptions, there are two ways in which the inscription is presented: individually, dealing with its transliteration, interpretation, background, etc. and/or as part of a larger corpus with which the inscription may share some commonalities. These commonalities may be graphic, phonetic, archaeological, etc., but in this paper I will talk about […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

De siste 60 årene har det vokst frem en sterk motstemme til magiske tolkninger av runer i runologiske fagmiljøer. Hovedinnvendingen er at ingen ting vites om de enkeltstående runetegnenes magiske funksjon, men at runer kun kan formidle magisk budskap gjennom innskriftene, i kraft av å være tegn i et skriftsystem. Uenigheten som har rådet blant […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

One of the most important contributors to our understanding of older runic epigraphy, Elmer Antonsen was a controversial scholar. Best remembered for bringing an overtly structural and neo-Bloomfieldian approach to the study of the earliest inscriptions, he was also something of a contrarian, promoting readings and interpretations of older runic texts which did not find […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

The medieval corpus of Danish runic inscriptions includes a group of 12 cast censers, one of which has been lost. The censers have been dated to the middle of the thirteenth century on the basis of several different typological characteristics: art historical style typology rune typology linguistic typology (Old Danish and Latin) text typology The […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

In recent years scholarship on the Viking Age rune-stones has tended to focus on single aspects of the stones and their features, without a ‘bigger-picture’ view. This paper sets out to begin filling in this gap, through a focus on a larger-scale interpretation of the rune-stones and what they disclose (implicitly) about the people(s) of […]

[ Continue reading ... ]