You are currently viewing abstracts filed in the session "Changing monuments"

The aim of this session (or sessions) is to discuss changes in the runestone tradition and in the perception of monuments, by contemporary as well as modern audiences. Previous meetings of the Runes, Monuments and Memorial Carvings Network have helped identify common traits in the use of runic monuments in Scandinavia and Norse settlement areas […]

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New additions to the modest corpus of Anglo-Saxon runic inscriptions are always to be welcomed, and a number of new discoveries have been made in recent years.  This paper reports on two inscriptions in Britain, one of which can be added to the Anglo-Saxon corpus and one to the less well-studied corpus of probable modern […]

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Around the turn of the last Millennium, two papers published by Judith Jesch and Anders Andrén respectively expressed the idea that the visual proximity of words in Swedish runic inscriptions of the 11th century may have been more than a mere coincidence. Both researchers argued independently that the Swedish rune-carvers of the Late Viking Age […]

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The location of the runic stones in the landscape is a key to the understanding of these monuments and their underlying meaning. By studying their location in the landscape in detail, it is possible to achieve a better understanding of the context where the stones textual messages were formulated. Often runic stones have been discussed […]

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The surviving evidence suggests that there was a long-standing and geographically widely-distributed tradition of runic writing in Norway. Relatively large numbers of inscriptions in the older futhark have been found in the country, on both portable objects and memorial stones. There are more medieval inscriptions known from Norway than anywhere else, mainly on objects found […]

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This paper considers the changing nature of discourse surrounding monuments bearing runic inscriptions in the Northern Isles.  In particular it will examine the runic inscription (Br OR05) on one stone from the late Neolithic/ early Bronze Age Ring of Brodgar.  This is an uncertain inscription; its ‘Viking age’ authenticity is not validated.  Amongst its interpretations […]

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In the 11th C AD, a picture stone tradition (including runic inscriptions) with a strong local character on Gotland is replaced by a rune stone tradition similar to that in the Mälar valley of the Swedish mainland. Gotland maintains some characteristics, such as the door-like shape of the monument, but the runic ornament is now […]

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The Old English runic corpus contains (at least) thirty-six inscriptions on stone monuments, almost all from the north of England, produced in the period ca. 700-900. The texts recorded vary greatly in length, content, care of execution, placement on the monument, and quality of survival. The majority of these inscribed monuments are memorials and many […]

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During the course of the eleventh century runic monuments came to be erected in Christian cemeteries in central Sweden. The earliest examples of churchyard monuments in this area are the early Christian grave monuments, often called Eskilstuna cists, which in their most elaborate form consisted of a lid slab, two side slabs and two gable […]

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The durability and longevity of the material of the Scandinavian runic memorial stones were considered important aspects of the monuments, as is occasionally attested in the inscription. Together with their size and weight, this can create the impression of static monuments. At the same time we know, however, that individual monuments were adapted and transformed, […]

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