You are currently viewing abstracts tagged with the keyword "Viking Age"

Handelsplatsen Birka på Björkö i Mälaren är en av portalplatserna inom skandinavisk och internationell vikingatidsforskning. Det är också en av de flitigast undersökta platserna.  Otaliga vetenskapliga arbeten har tagit sin utgångspunkt i det rikhaltiga fyndmaterial som genererats vid de många arkeologiska undersökningarna, men fortfarande finns många kunskapsluckor kvar att fylla. Detta gäller inte minst de […]

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There is a great variety of spelling of the same words and word forms in the runic inscriptions. This is something you cannot find in present-day texts. Obviously, the main reason for this spelling variability is the absence of any spelling standards. The main goal of this study was to find the factors of the […]

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Scandinavian Viking-Age runic epigraphy is according to Sawyer (2000, 8) always rendered in Old Scandinavian. However, there remains a tiny residue of 11th–12th c. epigraphs, which are reminiscent of texts in a natural language, yet not amenable to a Scandinavian (or Latin) reading and hence usually considered to be magical, encrypted, or nonsensical. Eliasson (2007, […]

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Around the turn of the last Millennium, two papers published by Judith Jesch and Anders Andrén respectively expressed the idea that the visual proximity of words in Swedish runic inscriptions of the 11th century may have been more than a mere coincidence. Both researchers argued independently that the Swedish rune-carvers of the Late Viking Age […]

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Min presentation gäller bildinnehållet på U 448, Harg i Odensala socken, Uppland, som består av en påfågel och en ryttare. Inskriften är en ren minnestext och har inte något explicit kristet element. Stenen har heller inte något kors. Jag kommer att behandla både fågeln och ryttarfiguren och jämföra med andra avbildningar, såväl på runstenar som […]

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In the spring of 2014, a Viking Age rune-stone was discovered at Sockburn, in Cleveland, a site already associated with a considerable number of Anglo-Scandinavian sculptures in the form of both hogbacks and crosses. The poster presents a preliminary interpretation of the inscription by the members of the Cleveland team of the Languages, Myths and […]

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The location of the runic stones in the landscape is a key to the understanding of these monuments and their underlying meaning. By studying their location in the landscape in detail, it is possible to achieve a better understanding of the context where the stones textual messages were formulated. Often runic stones have been discussed […]

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The surviving evidence suggests that there was a long-standing and geographically widely-distributed tradition of runic writing in Norway. Relatively large numbers of inscriptions in the older futhark have been found in the country, on both portable objects and memorial stones. There are more medieval inscriptions known from Norway than anywhere else, mainly on objects found […]

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Efter Erik Brates död i april 1924 övertog Elias Wessén arbetet med utgivningen av Södermanlands runinskrifter. Det första texthäftet som omfattar knappt hälften av landskapets runstenar hade utkommit strax före Brates död, men de flesta av planscherna hade dragits tillbaka eftersom många av fotografierna inte höll tillräckligt hög kvalitet. Under tre somrar 1928–30 undersökte Wessén […]

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In the 11th C AD, a picture stone tradition (including runic inscriptions) with a strong local character on Gotland is replaced by a rune stone tradition similar to that in the Mälar valley of the Swedish mainland. Gotland maintains some characteristics, such as the door-like shape of the monument, but the runic ornament is now […]

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Kennzeichnend für den Übergang vom Älteren Futhark zum Jüngeren Futhark im 7. und 8. Jh. ist in Skandinavien eine Reduzierung des Zeichenbestands von 24 auf 16 Zeichen, obwohl zu dieser Zeit durch sprachhistorische Lautwandelprozesse (z.B. Umlaut) eine erhebliche Erweiterung des Phonembestands zu verzeichnen ist. Es kam also dazu, dass die Runenreihe der Wikingerzeit (ca. 800-1100) […]

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Omkring 900 vikingatida rungraffiti på mynt beaktas mycket sällan i runologi, trots att de kan sprida ljus över runinskrifter som inte hade analogier. 1. Runinskriften på Værløse-spännet (Sj 21, 200-220 AD) alugod har åtta olika tolkningar. Men frånvaron av analogier gör dem alla föga troliga. Rungraffiti på mynt tillåter oss att föreslå en tolkning av […]

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During the course of the eleventh century runic monuments came to be erected in Christian cemeteries in central Sweden. The earliest examples of churchyard monuments in this area are the early Christian grave monuments, often called Eskilstuna cists, which in their most elaborate form consisted of a lid slab, two side slabs and two gable […]

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In Old Norwegian a phenomenon dubbed vowel harmony affects the realization of the unstressed phonemes /i/ and /u/. Researchers see this phenomenon as a progressive distant assimilation, where the closeness of a stressed vowel influences the closeness of the vowel in the following syllable. There has been debate concerning both the geographical distribution of this […]

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For those who are interested in Danish history the Jelling dynasty from the second half of the 10th century to 1042 has had a special meaning. The successive 6 kings from Gorm the Old (-958) to Hardecnut (-1042) transformed a small Danish kingdom into one of the most influential states in Northern Europe in the […]

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Att läsa runor på mindre lösföremål av metall är ofta förenat med specifika svårigheter och hinder. Därför kräver det också andra metoder än dem som används vid läsning av runinskrifter på t.ex. sten. För det första är runorna på metallföremål som regel mycket små och inte så sällan skadade av korrosion. Inskriftens yta kan ibland […]

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Pilgrimages played an important part in people’s religius life in the Middle Ages. The destination for these travels were sacred places  like Rome, Jerusalem, Santiago de Compstela.  The  Scandinavian countries also offered more local  alternatives for people who could not go that far,  St. Olav’s grave in Nidaros being the most popular. Pilgrimages are often […]

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In recent years scholarship on the Viking Age rune-stones has tended to focus on single aspects of the stones and their features, without a ‘bigger-picture’ view. This paper sets out to begin filling in this gap, through a focus on a larger-scale interpretation of the rune-stones and what they disclose (implicitly) about the people(s) of […]

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Runstenen Vg 199 är en inskrift som, trots att den varit känd sedan 1950-talet, ännu inte tolkats på ett tillfredsställande sätt. Att stenen har ansetts svårtolkad är förståeligt, då den är skadad och flera partier av inskriften därmed saknas. Dessutom är många av runorna på stenen så pass vittrade att det bitvis är i det […]

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The goal of this work is to classify the types of the “lock” element and its functions in the ornaments of the Uppland runestones. The lock is a natural (in a picture of a snake) or an artificial element of the ornament connecting the opposite ends of the snake, on which the runic inscription is […]

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Föredraget presenterar ett nytt tolkningsförslag av nekrologen på Ög 83. Förslaget ansluter till Alexandra Petrulevich tolkning av ortnamnet, men är delvis oberoende av det så länge som ualu kan förutsättas innehålla ett ortnamn. Inskriften på Ög 83 lyder · þura · sati · stin · þasi · aftiʀ · suin · sun · sin · ʀs · uʀstr · o · ualu · Þōra satti stæin […]

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