You are currently viewing abstracts tagged with the keyword "Phonology"

In Old Norwegian a phenomenon dubbed vowel harmony affects the realization of the unstressed phonemes /i/ and /u/. Researchers see this phenomenon as a progressive distant assimilation, where the closeness of a stressed vowel influences the closeness of the vowel in the following syllable. There has been debate concerning both the geographical distribution of this […]

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It is well known that the predecessor of Old Norse (ON) must have gone through a process of final devoicing at some point in time. As pointed out by O. Grønvik and H. Bjorvand, among other scholars, this follows quite clearly from internal reconstruction of Old Norse. Forms like 3. sg. pret. ON batt ‘bound’ […]

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As a common textbook definition, a grapheme is defined as ‘the smallest distinctive unit in a writing system’ and an allograph as a ‘variant of such a distinctive unit’ [Bußmann 2002:264; This definition is also given by Barnes & Page (2006:67).]. ‘Smallest’ seems to be unproblematic, however, the second requirement ‘distinctive’ is more difficult to […]

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