You are currently viewing abstracts tagged with the keyword "Medieval runes"

Whilst the runica manuscripta of the English tradition (Derolez 1954, Derolez 1991), the Scandinavian rune poems (Heizmann 1998, Bauer 2003), their recording in the scholarly, early medieval treatise (De inventione litterarum), their occasional use as the writer’s signature and within the Old High German glosses have been comparatively well-researched  (Nievergelt 2009), this does not apply […]

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In this paper I focus on writing norms associated with runic script, bringing into the discussion a largely unused source to Medieval writing, namely inscriptions written in Roman script. Not marking a nasal consonant before a plosive, not marking double consonants, not repeating a rune in initial position if it is same as the preceding […]

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During the course of the eleventh century runic monuments came to be erected in Christian cemeteries in central Sweden. The earliest examples of churchyard monuments in this area are the early Christian grave monuments, often called Eskilstuna cists, which in their most elaborate form consisted of a lid slab, two side slabs and two gable […]

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In Old Norwegian a phenomenon dubbed vowel harmony affects the realization of the unstressed phonemes /i/ and /u/. Researchers see this phenomenon as a progressive distant assimilation, where the closeness of a stressed vowel influences the closeness of the vowel in the following syllable. There has been debate concerning both the geographical distribution of this […]

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The aim of the paper is to present a model for the description of runic graphs and a method for their classification into graph-types and graph-type variants. The classification of runic graphs into graph-types and variants requires the establishment of typological criteria. Runologists have described runic graphs in various ways, employing different sets of graphic […]

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Pilgrimages played an important part in people’s religius life in the Middle Ages. The destination for these travels were sacred places  like Rome, Jerusalem, Santiago de Compstela.  The  Scandinavian countries also offered more local  alternatives for people who could not go that far,  St. Olav’s grave in Nidaros being the most popular. Pilgrimages are often […]

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The medieval corpus of Danish runic inscriptions includes a group of 12 cast censers, one of which has been lost. The censers have been dated to the middle of the thirteenth century on the basis of several different typological characteristics: art historical style typology rune typology linguistic typology (Old Danish and Latin) text typology The […]

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My poster addresses the issue of writing and reading runes in medieval Scandinavia from the perspective of specific visual strategies of runic literacy. The poster highlights the question of whether certain inscriptions allow us to trace a practice of employing recurring graphematic representations of particular ‘runic words’ or ‘phrases’ that stand visually and topographically distinct. […]

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