You are currently viewing abstracts tagged with the keyword "Denmark"

When dealing with documenting runic inscriptions, there are two ways in which the inscription is presented: individually, dealing with its transliteration, interpretation, background, etc. and/or as part of a larger corpus with which the inscription may share some commonalities. These commonalities may be graphic, phonetic, archaeological, etc., but in this paper I will talk about […]

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Kennzeichnend für den Übergang vom Älteren Futhark zum Jüngeren Futhark im 7. und 8. Jh. ist in Skandinavien eine Reduzierung des Zeichenbestands von 24 auf 16 Zeichen, obwohl zu dieser Zeit durch sprachhistorische Lautwandelprozesse (z.B. Umlaut) eine erhebliche Erweiterung des Phonembestands zu verzeichnen ist. Es kam also dazu, dass die Runenreihe der Wikingerzeit (ca. 800-1100) […]

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For those who are interested in Danish history the Jelling dynasty from the second half of the 10th century to 1042 has had a special meaning. The successive 6 kings from Gorm the Old (-958) to Hardecnut (-1042) transformed a small Danish kingdom into one of the most influential states in Northern Europe in the […]

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The medieval corpus of Danish runic inscriptions includes a group of 12 cast censers, one of which has been lost. The censers have been dated to the middle of the thirteenth century on the basis of several different typological characteristics: art historical style typology rune typology linguistic typology (Old Danish and Latin) text typology The […]

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