You are currently viewing abstracts tagged with the keyword "British Isles"

Although much runological fieldwork has been undertaken over the years, little has been written about it. The procedures adopted by the field runologist, the problems encountered and their solutions, are matters that can often only be dimly glimpsed in the text of the edition or article that emerges as the end product of the fieldwork. […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

New additions to the modest corpus of Anglo-Saxon runic inscriptions are always to be welcomed, and a number of new discoveries have been made in recent years.  This paper reports on two inscriptions in Britain, one of which can be added to the Anglo-Saxon corpus and one to the less well-studied corpus of probable modern […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

When dealing with documenting runic inscriptions, there are two ways in which the inscription is presented: individually, dealing with its transliteration, interpretation, background, etc. and/or as part of a larger corpus with which the inscription may share some commonalities. These commonalities may be graphic, phonetic, archaeological, etc., but in this paper I will talk about […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

In the spring of 2014, a Viking Age rune-stone was discovered at Sockburn, in Cleveland, a site already associated with a considerable number of Anglo-Scandinavian sculptures in the form of both hogbacks and crosses. The poster presents a preliminary interpretation of the inscription by the members of the Cleveland team of the Languages, Myths and […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

This paper considers the changing nature of discourse surrounding monuments bearing runic inscriptions in the Northern Isles.  In particular it will examine the runic inscription (Br OR05) on one stone from the late Neolithic/ early Bronze Age Ring of Brodgar.  This is an uncertain inscription; its ‘Viking age’ authenticity is not validated.  Amongst its interpretations […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

The Old English runic corpus contains (at least) thirty-six inscriptions on stone monuments, almost all from the north of England, produced in the period ca. 700-900. The texts recorded vary greatly in length, content, care of execution, placement on the monument, and quality of survival. The majority of these inscribed monuments are memorials and many […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

The aim of this paper is to revise and further analyse the functions of the runes ᛞ and ᛗ in the Glosses to the Lindisfarne Gospels. The work presented here is part of a project funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation which addresses various aspects of the morphosyntax and lexis of the […]

[ Continue reading ... ]

As a common textbook definition, a grapheme is defined as ‘the smallest distinctive unit in a writing system’ and an allograph as a ‘variant of such a distinctive unit’ [Bußmann 2002:264; This definition is also given by Barnes & Page (2006:67).]. ‘Smallest’ seems to be unproblematic, however, the second requirement ‘distinctive’ is more difficult to […]

[ Continue reading ... ]